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Letters to the Editor: August 4, 2012

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Kids need jobs: An issue parents should consider

Kids in Morris need summer jobs. When kids get to a certain age, their parents stop buying things for them so they need to find jobs. Fo r example, I'm writing this story to get a job in the paper.

I know they do lemonade stands, but I mean for the bigger kids. Even mall things like sweeping up the floors in a restaurant. Things like that, kids need jobs.

Kids need money so they can buy things they need like phones, computers, and maybe other things they want. You can buy some stuff now and save the rest. I speak from personal experience. I think that some kids in Morris also have the same problem.

Like I wrote up there, "an issue parents should consider."

Angel Gallegos (9 years old); Morris, Minn.

Flag lowered far too often

Thirteen men and women died in Operation Enduring Freedom from July 19 to 25, 2012.

But, President Obama and Governor Dayton did not order the U.S. flag to be flown at half-staff for these men who gave their lives for their country.

Yet when 12 people were killed in Aurora, CO., both men ordered flags to be flown at half-staff.

There seems to be something amiss here; go to a movie and get killed and flags are dropped to half-staff; go to Afghanistan, fight, and die, and few seem to even notice.

The U.S. flag is simply being lowered far too often. The honor has been cheapened so much we seldom pay any attention.

The worst lowering was for Whitney Houston, who was not even a veteran, yet the governor of New Jersey had the flags dropped to half-staff.

The honor is degraded when lowering the flag is done for a pop singer or for deaths by tornadoes or killings of other types. The flag is our national symbol, and ordering it to be flown at half-staff should only be done for those who have served our country, those who have sacrificed.

Ted Storck; Commander, VFW Post 5039, Morris; Retired Navy Reserve Commander

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